Stop saying WordPress is yours, Automattic. Please.

Hi Automattic, you list WordPress as one of your brands:

You know darn well it is not yours.

Matt was so generous to transfer that brand to the WordPress Foundation—matter of fact, he had to found it in the first place in order to transfer the WordPress brand to it.

I get the usability thinking:
“Let’s make it easier for people who look for brand materials. Let’s not send them around the internet to another site. Let’s have them download all they need right here.”

Except that this is entirely wrong.

You pro-actively frame a misconception many other WordPress contributors who are not your employees or founders, as well as other businesses are harmed by. (No, I don’t care to clarify, you know.)

I get that the download link next to that logo points to .org.
But who else than community insiders would make anything of it? People (including journalists) who are unfamiliar with WordPress history?

I also get that some things just “happen”.
Like, you were creators of WordPress last year. I get that you may not have phrased that ad yourself. But heck, can you understand all these little instances add up to something?

WordPress is ours, too.
We know that you know that we know … BUT OTHERS DON’T KNOW!

By listing the WordPress brand on your brand page, you put a clear message to the rest of the world who are not community insiders: THIS IS OURS.

I’m incredibly thankful, Automattic, for what you do for WordPress and its community in other places. That’s why I am so disappointed.

WordCamp Refugee

During WordCamp Europe 2017 in Paris I stayed at a hotel at Porte de Clignancourt, a 25 minutes walk from the conference venue. Each of the three days of the event, I would walk past improvised refugee shelters with no sanitary facilities whatsoever, as well as refugees camping out on the bare concrete underneath a freeway junction. On my third day, I had the opportunity to learn a valuable lesson, and this is how it happened.

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